People On Streets

So, as I used to say with my old blog, and I have been saying as of late, sorry I don’t post as much as I used to. It’s been over a week and a half since I’ve said anything to you guys. Well, here I am.

In my life group, we’ve been reading Habakuk. Habakuk comes from the Old Testament, and is one of the minor prophets. Habakuk wrote a lot of things about God and what God was allowing to happen to Israel, His chosen people, and the things he wrote weren’t always praising God.  In fact, the whole first chapter he spends his time basically asking God: “HELLO!?  God!? Do you SEE what is happening, not only to Your people, but to the whole world!?  The Chaldeans are taking over and slaughtering everyone!”

This is a normal response to crisis: we, as human beings, freak out.  Those of us who believe in God (and even some of those who don’t) look to God and ask, “Aren’t you going to DO something!?”  Heck, I’ve been looking for him to do something for a long, long time about the fact that I’m stuck in central PA doing a job that I’m overqualified working on a small budget and getting used to being married (believe it or not, the first year isn’t perfect, and anyone that says different clearly has blocked out that first year of their marriage in their brain.  It is, and has been, worth it; just so you know).  I’ve yelled it, whispered it, wondered it, and despaired over it: “God, what are you going to do?”

God’s response to Habakuk, more or less: “I know.  I got this.  I planned it, in fact.  Don’t worry, something big is happening.”

It’s the same response we get when we ask what God’s going to do.  “I got this.”  We don’t want to hear that.  We want to hear, “What would you like me to do?” Instead, we hear, “I got this.”

Many a sermon has been preached on this subject, and probably you’ve heard this already.  God’s got you in the palm of his hand.  He knows your worries.  He’s always taking care of you.

Blah, blah, blah…

Yeah, it doesn’t change the fact that you’re going home to a wife who thinks you’re a loser.  It doesn’t change the fact that you’re stuck in some job you hate just so you can pay the bills, and you don’t even do that very well, either.  It doesn’t change the fact that they’re gone and not coming back.  You’re left there with some bulletin from a church which says “God knows exactly what He’s doing,” but everything your life demonstrates that He’s a moron and hasn’t got a clue what you’re going through.

If you’re reading this, I want to give you hope, but I don’t want to do it with the same crap you’ve heard over and over again (no matter how true it is).  I want you to share your burden. In addition to reading Habakuk, I’ve been listening to Queen and David Bowie’s collaboration, “Under Pressure.” Frankly, we’ve forgotten we’re all under pressure, and that love can help to alleviate the tension, the pressure that “puts people on streets.”  Not a lot of people comment on my blog, but I want this to be the one time people do.

This is your chance: share your burden.  Anyone who reads this can do that.  What’s got your under pressure?  Pour it out.  In the same way we are encouraged to pour out our troubles to God (who, being Love, can help take away the pressure, if we let Him have His way), I encourage you to pour yours out here.  Paul tells us in Philippians to “look to the interests of others,” and share the load.  We all have a lot to carry, but I want to help out the weary.  I’m throwing this all out there to a limited audience, I know, but hey, this is a chance to take some of the weariness off.

Or you can just listen to Queen and David Bowie; your call.

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